Inside the White House


Chapter One: The Building and its Architecture  ›

Residence Act and G. Washington, L'Enfant: John W. Reps, Washington on View: The Nation's Capital Since 1790 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1991), 1-2. See also Constance McLaughlin Green, Washington: Village and Capital, 1800-1878 (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1963) for the early years of Washington, D.C. as the seat of government

Hoban as White House architect: William Seale, The White House: History of an American Idea (Washington: White House Historical Association, 2001), ix-xi. See also The White House 1792-1992: Image in Architecture, American Institute of Architects, 1992

L'Enfant plans for President's House: J.L. Sibley Jennings, "Artistry as Design: L'Enfant's Extraordinary City," Quarterly Journal of the Library of Congress, 36 (Summer 1979), 225-278; Seale, The White House, 10-12

Struggle, controversy over Capital site: Kenneth R. Bowling, Creating the Federal City, 1774-1800: Potomac Fever (Washington: American Institute of Architects Press, 1988), 7-11; see also Bowling, The Creation of Washington, D.C.: The Idea and Location of the American Capital (Fairfax, Va.: George Mason University Press, 1991)

White House architectural competition: William Seale, The President's House: A History, Vol. 1, (Washington: White House Historical Association, 2008), 27-32; William Ryan and Desmond Guinness, The White House: An Architectural History (New York: McGraw Hill, 1980), 35-53. See also Seale, The White House, 2, 5

White House stone and stone ornamentation: William Seale, "White House Album: Beauty and History Preserved in Stone," White House History (Spring 1998), 134-139; Seale, The White House, 16-17; see also Lee H. Nelson, White House Stone Carving: Builders and Restorers (Washington D.C. : U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, National Capital Region, 1992), 2-3

G. Washington alterations to Hoban design: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 47-50

Hoban and White House foundations site: Ibid., 34-35

White House cornerstone: Ibid., 36-37; see also Chalmers M. Roberts, "Mine Detector Locates Cornerstone of the White House," Washington Post, November 11, 1949

Open fields, pasture land surround White House site: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 11-12, 50; Frederick Gutheim, Worthy of the Nation: The History of Planning for the National Capital (Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1977), 39-40

Laborers, artisans in White House construction: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 64-68; Robert J. Kapsch, "Building Liberty's Capital: Black Labor and the New Federal City," American Visions 10 (February/March 1995), 8-10

John and Abigail Adams White House occupancy: William Seale, "The White House in John Adams's Presidency," White House History (Spring 2000), 32-41

"Content myself almost anywhere": Abigail Adams to Abigail Adams Smith, November 21, 1800, in Charles Francis Adams, ed., Letters of Mrs. Adams, Wife of John Adams, Vol. 2 (Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1840), 241

Jefferson sale of Adams finery: Betty C. Monkman, The White House: Its Historic Furnishings and First Families (Washington: White House Historical Association, 2000), 32

Jefferson changes to White House: Seale, The White House, I, 40-41 and The President's House, Vol. 1, 107-116

Jefferson relations with Latrobe: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 107-116

"Sorry that I am cramped": Talbot Hamlin, Benjamin Henry Latrobe (New York: Oxford University Press, 1955), 294. See also The President's House, Vol. 1, 113

Jefferson plans for White House grounds: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 114-115

Washington, D.C. population: Third Census of the United States, 1810. (National Archives and Records Administration microfilm publication M252, 71 rolls). Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.; Daniel D. Reiff, Washington Architecture, 1791-1861: Problems in Development (Washington: U.S. Commission of Fine Arts), 67-70

James and Dolley Madison in the White House: Catherine Allgor, Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000), 48-101; Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 119-135

Burning of White House (1814): Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 132-133; Anthony S. Pitch, "The Burning of the Washington," White House History (Fall 1998), 196-207. See also Pitch, The Burning of Washington: The British Invasion of 1814 (Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1998)

"Stood in awful silence": Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 133

"Complete drubbing": As quoted in George C. Daughan, 1812: The Navy's War (New York: Basic Books, 2011), 258

Press criticism of Madisons: Steve Vogel, Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks that Saved the Nation (New York: Random House, 2013), 250-251; Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 134

"Capital and the Union lost": Green, Washington: Village and Capital, 64

White House restoration (1814-17): William B. Bushong, "Ruin and Regeneration," White House History (Fall 1998), 214-222

White House porticos: The White House 1792-1992: Image in Architecture, American Institute of Architects, 1992

State Rooms refurbishing: Monkman, The White House: Its Historic Furnishings and First Families, 81-93

Lincoln furnishings appropriation: Ibid., 119-137

East Room renovation (1873-74): Ibid., 143-156

Tiffany screen: Ibid., 156-172

Caroline Harrison White House expansion plan: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 561-566 and The White House, 149-153

Theodore Roosevelt renovation (1902): William Seale, "Theodore Roosevelt's White House," White House History (Summer 2002), 319-327; see also Seale, The President's House, Vol. 1, 640-656 and The White House, 159-201

Taft and first Oval Office (West Wing): Seale, The President's House, Vol. 2, 19-20, and The White House, 203-205

Christmas Eve West Wing fire (1929): "$60,000 Flames Eat West Wing of White House," Washington Post, December 25, 1929; Robert Debs Heinl, Jr., "Twas the Night Before Christmas: Eyewitness Account of the West Wing Fire of 1929," accessed May 30, 2013

Hurried White House rebuilding and remodeling: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 2, 126-128

White House attic, roof and sunroom: Ibid., 35-36, and 126-132

F.D. Roosevelt and expanded office wing: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 2, 148-151 and The White House, 220-225

New East Wing (1942): Ibid., see also William B. Bushong, "Presidential Influence: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman and the Design of Washington's Icons of Power, 1933-1953" in Thomas E. Luebke, ed., Civic Art: A Centennial History of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, (Washington: GPO, 2013), 220-231

"So historic that you caught": As quoted in White House Historical Association, The White House: An Historic Guide, 21st ed. (Washington: White House Historical Association, 2001), 144

Aging White House: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 2, 270-272 and The White House, 237-240

"Trumans were the closest family": J.B. West, with Mary Lynn Kotz, Upstairs at the White House: My Life with the First Ladies (New York: Coward, McCann and Geoghegan, Inc., 1973), 63

Truman expansion plans and balcony: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 2, 254-263 and The White House, 233-235. See also Elizabeth B. Goldsmith, "Tempest in a Teapot: Truman's Failed Attempt at an Office Addition," and William P. O'Brien "Reality and Illusion: The White House and Harry S. Truman," White House History (Spring 1999), 254-262 and 263-272

"Facts in the case are this": Ibid., as quoted in O'Brien, "Reality and Illusion: The White House and Harry S. Truman," 257

Truman White House renovation (1948-52): Ibid., II, 237-277

White House furnishings during Truman renovation: Monkman, The White House: Its Historic Furnishings and First Families, 220-225

Truman televised White House tour (1952): Rex W. Scouten, "President Truman's Televised Tour," White House History (Spring 1999), 296-300

Diplomatic Reception Room furniture: Monkman, The White House: Its Historic Furnishings and First Families, 220-225

Jacqueline Kennedy and historic White House furnishings: Ibid., 226-252; see also Seale, The President's House, Vol. 2, 339-347 and The White House, 296-301; and Elaine Bachman Rice, "Circa 1961: The Kennedy White House Interiors," White House History (Winter 2004), 66-83

"Everything in the White House": Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., "A Stiff Regimen Leavened by Gaiety and Wit," Life 59 (November 5, 1965), 90

Fine and decorative arts donations: Monkman, The White House: Its Historic Furnishings and First Families, 220-225; see also Seale, The President's House, Vol. 2, 339-347 and The White House, 296-301; Rice, "Circa 1961: The Kennedy White House Interiors," 66-83

Public reaction to Kennedy restoration: Rice, "Circa 1961: The Kennedy White House Interiors," 66-83

"House transformed forever": William Seale, "Foreword," White House History (Collection 3, Number 14), 64

Committee for Preservation of the White House: Monkman, The White House: Its Historic Furnishings and First Families, 226-252

White House Preservation Fund: Ibid., 252-257

Reagan additions to White House collection: Ibid., 257-259

White House Endowment Fund campaign: Ibid., 259-262

Exterior paint preservation and stone restoration: Seale, The President's House, Vol. 2, 309-315

Historic American Building Survey project: Ibid.




»  Chapter One

»  Chapter Two

»  Chapter Three

»  Chapter Four

»  Chapter Five

»  Chapter Six

»  Chapter Seven

»  Chapter Eight

»  Chapter Nine

»  Chapter Ten


»  Source Note Index