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Mar 28, 2017 Washington, D.C.

The White House Historical Association announced today the sale of the Official 2017 White House Easter Eggs. The Association is the exclusive retailer of the 2017 American–made eggs and is honored to donate 18,000 of them to the White House for the Easter Egg Roll.

The wooden eggs will be given as gifts to children attending the White House Easter Egg Roll on Monday, April 17, 2017, the first of the Trump administration. The eggs are also available for purchase as individuals or as a five-egg set

Four of the eggs feature an image of the White House and are available in pastel colors of blue, yellow, pink, and green. The fifth egg features the presidential seal on a golden background. All eggs feature the signatures of President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump. 

The individual eggs in blue, yellow, pink, and green will retail for $8.50; the golden egg will retail for $14.95, and the five-egg set will retail for $34.95.

The eggs are on sale for pre-order beginning today at the Association’s online retail store, Shop.WhiteHouseHistory.org. Eggs will ship between April 28 – May 5, 2017. A select number of eggs will be available for purchase in the Association’s Washington, D.C. retail stores (1610 H Street, NW and in the White House Visitor Center at 1450 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW) beginning the week of April 10. Additionally, the Association will offer a limited number of eggs for sale near the exit of the Easter Egg Roll on Monday, April 17, located near the Ellipse Visitor Center (closest intersection 15th and Pennsylvania Ave.). 

Purchases of all Association products, including the White House Easter Eggs, support the Association’s nonprofit, nonpartisan mission to preserve, protect, and provide public access to the rich history of American’s Executive Mansion. 

History of the White House Easter Egg Roll

The first annual White House Easter Egg Roll was held on April 22, 1878, after President Rutherford B. Hayes agreed to open the White House grounds on Easter Monday to children who wanted to roll Easter eggs. Music played by the United States Marine Band is also a highlight of the event, started in 1889 by President Benjamin Harrison.

The egg roll holds an important place in White House history. World War I and food rationing stopped the event from 1917 to 1920. In 1942, egg rollers were sent back to the Capitol grounds, the place from which they had been ousted 64 years before. World War II then completely stopped the festivities from 1943 to 1945. President Harry Truman did not host an egg roll. During 1946 and 1947, food conservation efforts caused him to reluctantly cancel the affair. Then from 1948 through 1952, his renovation of the White House made the South Lawn a construction zone. President Dwight D. Eisenhower revived the tradition after its twelve-year hiatus, but a string of his successors could not be at the White House on Easter Monday to greet their egg roll visitors. President Gerald Ford reinstated the presidential appearance in 1976 - the first since Eisenhower had acted as host in 1960.

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About the white house historical association

First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy envisioned a restored White House that conveyed a sense of history through its decorative and fine arts. She sought to inspire Americans, especially children, to explore and engage with American history and its presidents. In 1961, the White House Historical Association was established to support her vision to preserve and share the Executive Mansion’s legacy for generations to come. Supported entirely by private resources, the Association’s mission is to assist in the preservation of the state and public rooms, fund acquisitions for the White House permanent collection, and educate the public on the history of the White House. Since its founding, the Association has given more than $45 million to the White House in fulfillment of its mission. 

To learn more about the White House Historical Association, please visit WhiteHouseHistory.org

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